Dating new fender amps dating rut

08 Feb

Both the Deluxe Reverb (DR) and Princeton Reverb (PR) “survived” the CBS silverface periods with minor changes.Many people consider the silverface amps just as sonically good as the blackface models.

Here's a faithful re-creation of the legendary and highly collectible Blackface Super Reverb from the 1960s. Designed to sound as close to the original as possible, the ˜65 Reissues are assembled in Corona, California and feature Jensen speakers (One C12K for the Deluxe and two C12Ks for the Twin, four P10Rs for the Super and one C10R for the Princeton), Schumacher transformers, traditional tremolo and tube-driven reverb to create that classic, "Blackface" sound so many players desire.

A 1957 tweed Vibrolux was reported with a tube chart printed with circuit “5E3” (tweed Deluxe) instead of the correct 5F11 (see photo).

Clearly Fender wasn’t afraid to use incorrect parts when they were in a bind. The 5G12 Concert is the earliest version from very late 1959 and early 1960 so the existence of a tweed example, while extremely rare, is certainly plausible since Fender was making lots of tweed amps during the same time period.

Tonal Characteristics: Bright, scooped midrange that is known as the "Blackface" sound, pronounced "Wine Glass" highs from the Jensen speakers and a slightly more polite power amp for crystal cleans that can also be cranked for great overdriven tones.

Who's it for: Players that love the original versions but are priced out of owning vintage amps, blues players, country players, rock players, guitarists trying to get classic "Blackface" sounds (a la Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, John Mayer), American-made amp enthusiasts, traditionalists, avid Fender collectors.