Dating cdvs cabinet cards

21 May

Glass plate negatives could be used to produce any number of copy prints, and were quickly employed in the mass production of images.Styles changed through the years, and various types of card mounted photographs prevailed -- but they are easy to distinguish, it all depends on the size.A style of photograph first introduced in 1863 by Windsor & Bridge in London, the cabinet card is a photographic print mounted on card stock.The Cabinet card got its name from its suitability for display in parlors -- especially in cabinets -- and was a popular medium for family portraits.The photographer may have been using up old card stock, or the cabinet card may have been a re-printed copy made many years after the original photo was taken.

It is important to note, however, that these dating methods aren't always accurate.Cabinet cards, popular in the late 1800s, are easy to recognize because they are mounted on cardstock, often with an imprint of the photographer and location just below the photo.There are similiar card-type photographs, such as the smaller which was introduced in the 1850s, but if your old photo is about 4x6 in size then chances are it is a cabinet card.See the list of Ten People All Genealogists Should Follow On Twitter Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies.She and her husband head to Salt Lake City Utah to research Janie's elusive 4th great-grandmother.